Donate
WHAT WE FUND

Malaria

Climate change and health

At a glance

Using mosquitoes to investigate the impact of temperature on malaria

Lead researcher

Dr Dari Da and Dr Joseph Challenger

Institution

Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé and Imperial College London

Status

Amount awarded

£302,881.00

Last updated

08/01/24

Share

Dr Dari Da and Dr Joseph Challenger will explore the effect of temperature on malaria transmission by monitoring wild mosquitoes.

Da and Challenger Dr Dari Da and Dr Joseph Challenger

Malaria is a significant public health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical settings. Malaria parasites are transmitted through bites on humans from female Anopheles mosquitoes. The ability of these mosquitoes to survive, reproduce, and harbour malaria parasites is known to be strongly influenced by temperature.

Through their Foundation-funded project, Dr Dari Da and Dr Josephe Challenger from Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé and Imperial College London, will study wild mosquitos to assess the impact of temperature on malaria transmission.

Most studies have been carried out on laboratory-reared mosquitos. These laboratory studies have shown that malaria transmission should not be possible if temperatures are too high or too low.

The team will instead study wild mosquitos, which may have evolved to cope with more extreme temperatures compared to laboratory-reared mosquitoes.

Dr Da and Dr Challenger will study how well wild malarial mosquitoes can survive and adapt in changing environmental conditions. This could help us better understand the implications that climate change could have on the spread of malaria.